Australian soft drinks contain high levels of glucose, says report


Soft drinks produced in Australia contain high levels of glucose, which has the potential to increase the risk of type 2 diabetes and heart disease, reveals a report of the Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute.

Researchers at Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute found that glucose content (predominantly from sucrose) was 22% higher in four popular Australian soft drinks compared to those in the US.

The glucose content in Australian soft drinks is said to be higher because they are sweetened using sugarcane-derived sucrose, while formulations marketed under the same trade name in the US use high-fructose corn syrup, while Europe uses sugar beet.

"Glucose content (predominantly from sucrose) was 22% higher in four popular Australian soft drinks compared to those in the US."

The report suggested that the glucose has the potential to quickly increase plasma glucose and insulin in the human body, implying that regular consumption could lead to type 2 diabetes.

A recent Australian Health survey indicated that Australians are high consumers of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), with nearly 39% of all men and 29% of women being regular consumers of SSBs.


Image: Soft drinks could increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. Photo: courtesy of Baker Heart and Diabetes Institute.